Football

The origin of football can be found in every corner of geography and history. It is the most popular sport in the world. However, it was not until 1985 in Kobe that football was included into the compulsory programme of the Universiade. It’s now one of the biggest Universiade Tournaments.

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EVENTS Summer universiade

All Events Summer Universiade

2019

Napoli (ITA), 3-14 July

2017

Taipei City (TPE), 19-30 August

2015

 Gwangju (KOR), 3-14 July

2013

 Kazan (RUS), 6-17 July

2011

Shenzhen (CHN) 12-23 August

2009

Belgrade (SRB) 1-12 July

Football

History of Football in FISU

The origin of football can be found in every corner of geography and history. Long before our era, many cultures played a certain kind of ball game. Contemporary football as we know it today traces back to England in the 1900s, when rugby football and association football branched off on their different courses. From there on, football experienced an increasing professionalisation and popularity first in Europe and later all over the world. However, it was not until 1966 in Galicia that football was included into the programme of FISU. The first tournament was held in the structure of a European University Championship and eight European teams battled for the first gold medal in university football. During the following years, FISU successfully staged many World University Football Championships, steadily growing in participation figures. At the Summer Universiade in 1979 in Mexico City, football was included as an optional sport and twenty-four teams competed in the tournament. Three years later, FISU staged the final edition of the FISU World University Football Championships, to have football then included as a compulsory sport at the Summer Universiade in 1985 in Kobe (JPN). The greatest surprise at this tournament came from the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, who took the final against Uruguay.
In 1993, university football was opened for women and Buffalo hosted the first edition of the FISU women’s football tournament where China beat the United States in their home match. In the following years the success of women’s football progressed further. By the time of the Universiade in Beijing in 2001, it was so well-accepted that the Executive Committee of FISU decided to increase the number of women’s teams from 8 to 16, equalling the number of men’s teams. Up to now, the FISU women’s football tournaments are striking for their high level of performance. In Shenzhen in 2011 China beat Japan in a technically fantastic and breathtaking final, delivering a match on the level of a women’s world cup game.

 

FISU Regulations

The football tournament will be organised in accordance with the most recent technical regulations of the “Fédération Internationale de Football Association” (FIFA). The programme and duration of the competitions will be fixed by the Executive Committee in agreement with the Organising Committee and the CTI. In principle, the competitions will last eleven (11) days and will include:

  • one (1) men's tournament: sixteen (16) teams maximum
  • one (1) women's tournament : sixteen (16) teams maximum
     

The countries participating in the football tournament must bring with their delegation and at their own cost:

  • Men’s tournament: one (1) international FIFA referee
  • Women’s tournament: one (1) international FIFA referee
     

Each country selected is authorised to enter one (1) men’s team of a minimum of eighteen (18) and a maximum of twenty (20) players and one (1) women’s team of a minimum of eighteen (18) and a maximum of twenty (20) players.

 

Minimum Requirements for Football

The Organising Committee must provide suitable facilities to stage the football competition as approved by the Football CT. The FIFA regulations must be followed.

 

Competition Facilities

Type of Venue

Number of Venues

Changing room competitors

Changing room TOJR

Spectator Seating

Press and Media Seating

Men’s Pitches Preliminaries

2

4

4

2,000

100

Men’s Pitches Finals/Semi-Finals

2

4

4

10,000

100

Women’s Pitches Preliminaries

2

4

4

2,000

100

Women’s Pitches Finals/Semi-

2

4

4

10,000

100

Training

10

2

-

-

-

 

  • Men: four natural floodlit grass pitches must be provided to full international standards and dimensions complying with FIFA Regulations
  • Women: four natural grass pitches (two floodlit) must be provided to full international standards and dimensions complying with FIFA Regulations
  • Two of the pitches to be designated for finals/semi-finals and located within a stadium
     

Note: eight natural grass competition venues should be provided with a minimum of six (6) floodlit grass pitches.

 

Training Facilities

Wherever possible, ten (10) training pitches must have a natural grass surface.

 

Previous Events

  • 2015 - 28th Summer Universiade - Gwangju (KOR)
  • 2013 - 27th Summer Universidade - Kazan (RUS)
  • 2011 - 26th Summer Universiade – Shenzhen (CHN)
  • 2009 - 25th Summer Universiade – Belgrade (SRB)
  • 2007 - 24th Summer Universiade – Bangkok (THA)
  • 2005 - 23rd Summer Universiade – Izmir (TUR)
  • 2003 - 22nd Summer Universiade – Daegu (KOR)
  • 2001 - 21st Summer Universiade – Beijing (CHN)
  • 1999 - 20th Summer Universiade - Palma de Mallorca (ESP)
  • 1997 - 19th Summer Universiade – Sicily (ITA)
  • 1995 - 18th Summer Universiade – Fukuoka (JPN)
  • 1993 - 17th Summer Universiade – Buffalo (USA)
  • 1991 - 16th Summer Universiade – Sheffield (GBR)
  • 1987 - 14th Summer Universiade – Zagreb (YUG)
  • 1985 - 13th Summer Universiade – Kobe (JPN)
  • 1982 - 6th WUC Football - Mexico (MEX)
  • 1981 - 11th Summer Universiade – Bucharest (ROU)
  • 1979 - 10th Summer Universiade - Mexico City (MEX)
  • 1976 - 5th WUC Football - Uruguay (URU)
  • 1974 - 4th WUC Football - Grenoble (FRA)
  • 1972 - 3rd EUC Football - Bucharest (ROU)
  • 1970 - 2nd EUC Football - Skopje (YUG)
  • 1966 - 1st EUC Football - Galicia (ESP)